CFA Timeline

1865

Jack Miner born in Dover Center, Ohio. Known as ‘Father of Conservation’; tracked 500 000 wild ducks and spread his conservation message to the world.

1888

Grey Owl born Archibald Stansfeld Belaney in Hastings, England. Known worldwide a naturalist ahead of his time.

1899

Elihu Stewart appointed Chief Inspector of Timber and Forestry under the Department of the Interior. Stewart became known as father of the Dominion Forest Service (later renamed the Canadian Forest Service), and the CFA.

1900

March 8. CFA established by a group of influential Canadians from government and industry, at the Canadian parliament buildings, Ottawa ON.

[circa] CFA launches “The Canadian Forestry Journal” a modest publication that becomes the voice of Canada’s forests. It flourishes through the first half of the century publishing technical reports on the state of forests and articles promoting conservation of forest resources.

1906

January 10-12. first Canadian Forestry Convention held in the Railway Committee Room of the Canadian parliament buildings, Ottawa ON.

1907

Faculty of Forestry at University of Toronto. It is the oldest forestry faculty and the pioneer of scientific forest management in Canada.

1920

[circa] Forest Fire Prevention Week established by American Advertising Council.

1935

CFA Founder Elihu Stewart dies.

1956

Smokey Bear comes to Canada.

1959

CFA’s national magazine “The Canadian Forestry Journal” merges with private sector “Rod and Gun Magazine.”

1966

Second National Forest Congress held in Montebello QC; called for improved legislation involving partnership agreements between government and industry.

1968

Forest Fire Prevention Week renamed to National Forest Week by CFA.

1977

Third National Forest Congress held in Quebec City QC; emphasized the urgent need for forest renewal in Canada.

1979

Forest Capital of Canada program established by CFA.

Hudson Bay SK designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1980

The Miramichi NB designated Forest Capital of Canada.

Fourth National Forest Congress held in Toronto ON; stressed the need for Canadians to reinvest in forests to achieve the “best possible returns.”

1981

Prince George BC designated Forest Capital of Canada.

Fifth National Forest Congress held in Banff AB; restricted to group of 50 leaders from industry, labour, government, media and financial community who gathered to review past congresses, analyse past recommendations, and prioritize issues.

1982

County of Simcoe ON designated Forest Capital of Canada

1983

Smokey Lake District AB designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1984

The Ottawa Valley ON & QC designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1985

Prince Albert & District SK designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1986

City of Port Alberni BC designated Forest Capital of Canada. Sixth National Forest Congress held in Ottawa ON; designed to build a national consensus and commitment to the future of Canada’s forests. Newly formed Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM) participated for first time. 

1987

Queen’s County NS designated Forest Capital of Canada. First National Forest Sector Strategy for Canada published as a result of the 1986 Sixth National Forest Congress.

1988

Grand Falls NL designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1989

La Sarre QC designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1990

Sault Ste Marie ON designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1991

Nackawic NB designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1992

 Chetwynd BC designated Forest Capital of Canada.

Seventh National Forest Congress held in Ottawa ON; focused on 1992 National Forest Strategy, Sustainable Forests: A Canadian Commitment; served to highlight advances in sustainable forest management. First Canada Forest Accord signed, at the Seventh National Forest Congress, by 29 government and non-government organizations, and hundreds of Canadians committed to the future of Canada’s forests.

1993

Matapedia Valley QC designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1994

Edmonton AB designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1995

Meadow Lake SK designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1996

Lunenburg County NS designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1997

Grande Prairie AB designated Forest Capital of Canada.

1998

Swan Valley MB designated Forest Capital of Canada.

Eighth National Forest Congress held in Ottawa ON; focused on National Forest Strategy (1998-2003), Sustainable Forests: A Canadian Commitment.

Second Canada Forest Accord signed, at the Eighth National Forest Congress, by 42 (up from 29 in 1992) government and non-government organizations, and hundreds of Canadians committed to the pursuit of Canada’s forests nationwide.

1999

Kenora, Keewatin and Jaffray-Melick ON designated Forest Capital of Canada.

2000

CFA celebrates its centennial at Forest Sustainability Beyond 2000 Conference, Thunder Bay ON.

Ontario’s Northwest [Thunder Bay ON] designated Forest Capital of Canada.

CFA publishes Volume 1 of Canada’s Forests Teaching Kit Series – Learning from the Past, Building for the Future .

2001

La Mauricie [Shawinigan] QC designated Forest Capital of Canada. CFA publishes Volume 2 of Canada’s Forests Teaching Kit Series – A Breath of Fresh Air – Climate Change.

2002

CFA publishes Volume 3 of Canada’s Forests Teaching Kit Series – All Things Big and Small – Biodiversity.

2002/03

Corner Brook NL designated Forest Capital of Canada.

2003

Fifth National Forest Strategy [2003-2008], A Sustainable Forest: The Canadian Commitment presented by National Forest Strategy Committee at the 9th National Forest Congress in Ottawa ON. The new strategy provided direction for policy development, research initiatives and activites to improve forestry practices.

XII World Forestry Congress, Quebec City QC.

CFA publishes Volume 4 of Canada’s Forests Teaching Kit Series – Source of Life – Sustainable Forests.

2004

Town of Lac La Biche and Lakeland County AB designated Forest Capital of Canada CFA publishes Volume 5 of Canada’s Forests Teaching Kit Series – A Fine Balance – Species at Risk.

2005

Alberta’s Boreal Region designated Forest Capital of Canada.

2006

Gatineau QC celebrates the bicentennial of Philemon Wright’s timber rafting on the Ottawa River and elements of the Forest Capital of Canada.

CFA convenes the 10th National Forest Congress, Gatineau/Ottawa, marking 100 years since the First Canadian Forestry Conference, convened by CFA in 1906.

2007

CFA designates the Town of Oakville as Forest Capital of Canada, honouring this Ontario community, during its sesquicentennial, for its meritorious record of urban forest planning and stewardship.

2008

CFA designates the Norfolk County as Forest Capital of Canada.

2010/11

2010-2011 CFA designates the Cariboo Regional District as Forest Captial of Canada.

2011

CFA designates the province of British Columbia as Forest Captial of Canada.

2012

CFA designates Whitecourt, Alberta as Forest Captial of Canada.

2015 - 2017

CFA & CIF designates Hearst – Constance Lake First Nations – Mattice-Val Côte, Ontario as Forest Captial of Canada.